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The transformative power of words

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Banaz: A Love Story

Part of the Freedom on Film series.

and Fuuse.

Wed 6 Mar 2013, 6:30pm

Free Word Lecture Theatre

Film poster for Banaz: A Love Story

Free Word invites you to a screening of Banaz: A Love Story,  in collaboration with ARTICLE 19 and Fuuse.

The screening is part of our ‘Freedom on Film’ series, exploring freedom of expression through film.

Banaz: A Love Story is a documentary that examines honour killings in the UK through the story of Banaz Mahmod, who was murdered by her own family in 2006.

It was a case that shocked the world and received international press coverage; but until the film, the voice of Banaz herself had never been heard.

“An excellent film... a powerful indictment of the misogynistic control that menaces some communities, and the misplaced cultural sensitivity that allows it to go unchallenged.” - The Observer

Directed by international music artist and activist-turned-filmmaker Deeyah, the film was first aired in the UK in the autumn of last year.

Join us at Free Word to watch the film, then listen and interact with a panel discussion about some of the difficult issues it raises, including honour based violence, the place of the female voice within minority communities in multicultural society and the tension between fundamental human rights for the individual and the rights of a community.

 

Banaz: A Love Story is a Fuuse film.

Chaired by Dr Purna Sen, Director of the Programme for African Leadership at the London School of Economics, the panel includes:

Gurpreet Bhatti, a British Sikh writer whose play Behzti (Dishonour) was controversially cancelled by the Birmingham Rep in 2004. She has also accused the BBC of censoring a recent radio drama she wrote focusing on an honour killing.

Diana Nammi, a campaigner from Kurdistan-Iran. She has led many campaigns for human rights, freedom and equality, was subjected to persecution and had to flee Iran. She now lives in the UK.

Detective Chief Inspector Caroline Goode, the senior Scotland Yard detective who investigated the case and brought the killers to justice.

Deeyah, the film’s director and producer, who has herself been subject to honour related threats and abuse.